How do I deal with my deep-rooted emotion? | J. Krishnamurti

How do I deal with my deep-rooted emotion? | J. Krishnamurti


Third Question: ‘My behaviour
indicates that I am afraid. Yet the actual perception
of fear is elusive. How do I reach and deal with this
deep-seated but unconscious emotion?’ ‘My behaviour indicates
that I am afraid. Yet the actual perception
of fear is elusive. How do I reach and deal with this
deep-seated but unconscious emotion?’ Do you want to go into this now? I was going to deal with it
on Saturday. It doesn’t matter,
we will deal both days. If one has observed, this problem of fear has existed
from time immemorial. Right? It has existed with man. And man has lived with it, both consciously or hidden deep
down, its roots very, very deep. And either we have escaped from it
through logic, through analysis, through any form of entertainment that helps us to avoid
coming directly into contact with it and holding it, or we have suppressed it. Right? We do this.
Or we neglect it. We say, ‘What, we have lived
with fear for million years, so what does it matter now?’ And one knows
the consequences of fear: physical shrinkage, a tendency to be hypocritical,
resistance, an avoidance of the fact
that one is really afraid. So if one really, profoundly wants
to be free from that reaction called fear, one has to go to the very root of it. There is biological fears: the body, the organism
which must protect itself, and the fear of disease,
old age, death, and the fears of past memories. So fear is again a common ground
upon which all human beings stand. So, either we deal with it
superficially or enquire into it very, very deeply. What is the root of fear? One knows various forms of fear: death, old age, fear of tomorrow,
fear of uncertainty, fear of insecurity,
fear of not being loved, or love and not receiving
that love, fear of loneliness, fear of loss, fear of not having
anybody to depend on, and so on – there are various forms of fear – the fear of the dark,
the fear of light. Do we deal
with the outward forms of fear? That is, I am afraid of my wife, or I am afraid of a bully; a bully, bullying all the time,
you lie, you do all kinds of things, and there is the fear
of that constant pressure of an aggressive,
slightly demented person. So do we want to deal
with fear superficially, which is intellectually, verbally, or do we want to go into it
very, very deeply? Please, this is a serious question
which you must answer for yourself. If you want to go into it
superficially, that is endless. It is like a tree – the moment you cut down
one branch or one twig of it there is another one rising.
It’s perpetual flowering of fear. Or, you go into it
observing its very nature, structure, how it comes into being. When we want to deal with it deeply,
go to the very root of it, what is the root of fear? Please, I am not telling you,
the speaker is not pointing out. We are together investigating into
a tremendous complicated problem which has crippled humanity. And out of fear we have done
all kinds of things; invented all the gods on earth. If there is absolutely
no psychological fear then you are beyond all gods. So what is basically
the root of fear? Is it time and thought? Please, we are investigating, I am
not telling you, I am questioning. Is it time, the future or the past? And is it also thought,
thinking about the future, thinking about the past, thinking what
might happen, or what has happened. The future is time. The past is time. The past,
modifying itself in the present, moves towards tomorrow,
the future. The remembrance of an incident
which has caused fear, and the future of that incident
awakening the new fear. You are following all this? Am I talking to myself
or we are meeting each other? So there is horizontal fear
and vertical fear. Right? So we are asking, is it time? The past,
the present and the future. One is afraid of the present: the instability, the threat of war, the bomb that some country, another great tribal country
might put it on this – and so on. So one is afraid of the past,
the present and the future. This is a movement
– right? – it is not something that is static,
it is a movement. And so a movement means time. From here to the village requires
time to travel, to go to the village. From one point to another point
means time. So, we are asking if time
is one of the factors of fear. Logically it seems so.
Rationally, sanely. And is thought also the root of fear? I think tomorrow
might bring me unemployment, I will be unemployed tomorrow. The thinking about it
while I am employed, thinking about the tomorrow
is also the beginning of fear. Right? You are following? Thinking about the past, the incidents,
the psychological accidents which has brought about
certain forms of fear, thinking about the past,
thinking about the future, thinking about
the actual moment of life in which there is such
tremendous uncertainty. Thought breeds fear. Right?
You are following all this? So time and thought,
are they the major factors of fear? And if they are, and as in reality
they are, what is one to do? You understand my problem?
Are we meeting each other? You have explained this to me, that
time and thought is the root of fear. You have gone into it,
you have explained it. Not in great detail but I’ve captured
the meaning of what you have said. Now, then you ask me, is it an idea
that you have accepted, the words that you have accepted,
or listening what you have said to me, from that listening I have made
an abstraction of it into an idea, and I’m struggling with the idea. Then I ask, how am I
to put that idea into action? You see the difference?
Vous avez compris? You have understood
what I am saying? Is this clear? No. We have the habit
of making abstractions of a fact. Those abstractions become ideals,
ideas, concepts, conclusions – all verbal. And then I ask myself, how am I to carry out these ideals,
these ideas, these concepts, that time and thought
are the root of fear. You’ve understood? I have made an abstraction
of what you have told me: time and thought
are the root of fear. And I am pursuing the idea,
how am I to carry out in life. The speaker says
please don’t do that. Don’t make an abstraction
of what you have heard, that time and thought
are the root of fear. Don’t translate into an idea
but find out the truth of it, the actuality of it. That is, I see that I really am
afraid of the past, which is so. Also I am afraid of the present, because the things are
so incredibly destructive round me. And also I am afraid
of tomorrow, the future – the atom bomb, the nuclear bomb,
the mugging, the mad terrorists
and the politicians with their game, that’s the present,
so also the future. So, I see the fact, not the idea, that
time and thought are the root of fear. Next Saturday I’ll go into it
much more, in a different way, but this is the root of fear. Now what shall I do? I realise, I see the fact. I see
the truth of what you have told me. Not romantic, idealistic, all that,
that has no meaning. I see the truth, the actual truth
of what you have told me. Then the difficulty arises,
if you have gone that far, who is the observer
who actually sees the fact? You understand all this,
or is this too difficult? All right. Who is the observer who says,
‘Ah yes, I see the truth of it’? Is the observer
different from what he sees? You understand my question? When I say, ‘Yes, I see the truth
of what you have told me, I have already played a trick,
which is: I see the truth of it. That means I am different
from the truth. You are following? Right? Is this clear? Wait a minute,
let me put it much more simply. When I am angry,
is that anger different from me? Or at the moment of anger
there is no difference. There is this tremendous reaction. A few seconds later I say,
‘I have been angry’, therefore I have divided myself
as the ‘me’ who has been angry. Right? You see? So, when you have told me
the truth, the fact, that time and thought
are the factors of fear, I listen to it very carefully and I say,
‘Yes, I see the truth of it’, and the perception of that truth
is something out there, and me watching it.
Follow this? Or, there is no observer
but only the fact of it. You understand the difference?
Are we meeting? I observe that tree. In that observation, words spring up:
‘That’s an oak tree’, and the very naming of that tree prevents me
from actually looking at it. You have understood? If I go to a museum and see a picture,
a painting by the old masters – I don’t like modern paintings,
that doesn’t matter – and I go there and look. When I compare one master
against another master I am not looking at the actual
painting of a particular master. I am comparing, judging,
I am never observing very closely without any sense of other painters,
looking. So, when I observe, when I see
the truth of what you have told me, there is no division between
the observer and the observed. There is only the truth of it.
Not, I see it. And that perception which is holistic
frees the mind from fear completely. Have you got this? Don’t look, please, so puzzled. Look, sir. What time is it? Q: Twelve thirty. K: You are not tired?
Can we go on with this? It’s very important
to understand this. I am afraid – suppose I am afraid,
psychologically – I then try to control it,
I try to rationalise it, I try to escape from it, I go
to somebody to help me to resolve it. So I am always acting on it.
Right? Is that clear? That’s what we are all doing: acting upon it either to dissipate it
or to control it or to run away from it
or to suppress it. This is what we do,
acting upon it. So there is always this conflict. Right? Is that clear? The struggle not to be afraid,
which is a conflict. Now, can that conflict end?
You understand? I am putting the question
differently. Can that conflict
between me and the fear, me controlling the fear,
suppressing and so on, and thereby this division
which inevitably brings conflict, can that conflict end?
You get the point? That’s my question. I say,
how can that conflict end? Why does this division
between the ‘me’, the I who is trying to suppress,
control, dominate fear, why is there this division? Is this division actual or is it merely semantic, verbal? Or, not being able
to solve the problem, thought has divided itself
as the ‘me’ and the fear. You understand? Am I talking to myself
or can we go on? Sorry, you probably have
never thought about all this. So, it is important to resolve this
conflict, because we live in duality. ‘I am this, I should not be that…
I should be that’. So there is always this duality
which brings about conflict. Right? Now, I want to find out
– no, I won’t use ‘I want to’ – can this conflict end? Is there – please listen to it –
is there an opposite? I am afraid. The opposite is not to be afraid
– right? – or have courage. Is there an opposite to fear? Or there is only the ending of fear,
not the opposite of fear. I wonder if you see all this. So, is there an ending of fear? – the ending being no conflict.
Right? If I end it through conflict, that
means I’ll go on, it’ll be perpetual. You get this?
So can this end? To end something, there must be no me
who is trying to end it. Right? If I try to end it,
I am in conflict with it. Right? But is there an observation
of this reaction called fear without the past interfering
with that observation? The past being the remembrances,
the many fears I have had. So the past, can it abstain
from looking at the fact without the memory of yesterdays? You haven’t understood? Look, sir: if I am married,
I meet my wife every day. Every day
– rather boring, every day. Listen carefully please,
don’t laugh – every day. So I begin to know her; I know how she looks,
what her gestures, all the rest of it, the words, so gradually I have built up
a knowledge about her, and whenever I look at her
all the knowledge comes out. Right? The knowledge is the past
– right? – because I have built the knowledge day after day, day after day,
day after day, accumulated it through various
incidents and so on and so on. So whenever I see her, this knowledge,
which is the past, looks at her. You are doing this,
this is nothing new. Only we are putting into words. And so this knowledge
is the remembrance of things past, meeting the present and so dividing.
Right? Physically of course my wife
is not like me – male and female. But psychologically
I have divided myself. Do you understand? The remembrance
of the accumulated memories, which is knowledge about my wife, has separated
as the ‘me’ and her. Got this? The past has brought about
this division. Now similarly,
the past remembrances of fears, past remembrance
of accidents of fear, the happenings of fear,
is stored in the brain, and that brain
is remembering the past, and so when the present reaction
comes, you name it immediately as fear, and record it as fear.
You follow this? Right? Is this clear? No, don’t tell me this is not clear.
I can’t help it, sorry. I’ll try to put it ten,
three or four different ways. The past is time. The past is the observer. And so the observer says,
yes, that is fear. I know it’s fear
because I have had it so many times. So, moment it recognises it,
it’s part of the past. Right? You see this fact. So can you look at that reaction… is there an observation
of that reaction without the past? And when the past observes,
you maintain the same movement. But when there is an observation
without the past, you are looking at it afresh. Which is, when you observe
fear from the past, you are using an energy which has
already been employed year after year. Right? That’s a wastage of energy. Is there a new energy that meets
this fear without the past? You understand the question now?
Oh, for God’s sake! You see, fear exists only – I realise, one sees the truth that
time and thought are the root of fear. Fear exists when there is inattention,
when there is no attention. Right? If I give complete attention to fear,
it doesn’t exist. But my brain
has been conditioned not to give attention
to this reaction. When you have sexual feelings
you – right? Whereas fear, if you give total attention to it which is not to analyse it,
not to rationalise it, not to escape from it,
not to observe it from the past – attention means
giving your whole energy to look. Right?
Then when you do, fear is not. I can’t go on into this. We can go into it
in different ways. On Saturday we’ll go into it
very much more. Because the mind that has fear
is a destructive, aggressive, neurotic mind, whereas a mind that is
utterly free of fear psychologically is an extraordinary mind.

100 Comments

  1. Dheeraj Goswami says:

    Which talk Krishnamurti gave on the consecutive day to the present talk, as he said we will talk further on this tomorrow. Please share some link.

  2. Kevin Berthier says:

    It is so pity that Krishnamurti was not able to teach Vipassana meditation. It's exactly what he is talking about but at the experiential level. Not just talking about it. Fear is the reaction for sensations created by thoughts, and this reaction is unconscious.. Until you learn to be conscious of this phenomenon and be liberated from fear and all kinds of suffering

  3. karl schreiner says:

    Is there somewhere this from saturday? 🙂

  4. Paul Crosse says:

    Listening to Krishnamurti is a great joy and always brings clarity and peace. What grace to have lived in a time where this man can be heard, seen and venerated.

  5. Adrian Lee says:

    This is why the quiet mind is so important.

  6. Mind Funk says:

    There is no way to find you true self other than by learning the ultmate truth about life. You must embark on a lifelong inner quest for enligthenment and give up the love of the lie. Google truthcontest, click the Earth icon, read the present, nothing could be more important or worthwhile.

  7. Joe Public001 says:

    Looking at your wife afresh everyday… you create a new energy when you forget the past

  8. batu says:

    best speech in youtube without a doubt

  9. Romana Strasheim says:

    Thank you.

  10. Pierre Andre says:

    He has been such, a WONDERFUL TEACHER . AND VERY WISE MAN AS WELL !

  11. Corky St. Claire says:

    Hello. Please do not consider this posting, and the questions therein, to be rude or inconsiderate; that is not my intention at all….

    At 22:34 of this video, Krishnamurti is using the example of viewing paintings at a museum. He mentions that he likes the old masters and not modern painting. (In another video he mentions that he does not like rock-n-roll music (actually he says that he does not see how that can be called music).) But doesn't like and dislike create conflict because it is based on the 'I' choosing?

    Or does the idea of like and dislike creating conflict apply to the psychological sphere? That is, if one is looking at anger (or any other emotion), it is important not to identify like or dislike because this creates conflict with 'what is'. Like and dislike are a form of avoiding 'what is'.
    [But then separating the psychological sphere from the totality of life is itself a form of conflict because there is no difference — all spheres are within one ocean with an ebb and a flow.]

    But where does one draw the line? For instance, I do not like noisy, congested places or, a more specific example, barking dogs, which are a problem in my neighborhood. These situations cause me anxiety, frustration, anger, and so on. Is it wrong for me to dislike noisy places (or barking dogs), just as Krishnamurti is saying that he dislikes modern paintings or rock-n-roll music? Is it wrong to avoid noisy, congested places or places with barking dogs, OR is it wrong to avoid these places only because doing so allows me to avoid looking at, and understanding, the emotions that those situations cause in me?

    If I have looked at these emotions and understood them, then those situations should not disturb me. And yet, does that mean that I should subject myself to those situations when I have options that would allow me to be in more tranquil surroundings?
    If someone does not like modern paintings does that mean they should decorate their house with modern paintings, rather than their preferred classical paintings, because not to do so implies that they are avoiding the 'what is' of their dislike for modern paintings? If someone does not like spicy foods, should they eat spicy foods because not doing so implies an avoidance of 'what is'?
    [If replying, I would appreciate connections with Krishnamurti's teachings — e.g. other videos or his books.]

  12. dan020350 says:

    ❤️

  13. bboyblue74 says:

    Profound yet practical.

  14. White trash can says:

    For the love of god, yes, I understand!

  15. Juan Callao says:

    Thank you so much, it can take you to very doorway of understanding ..

  16. Farhat says:

    What is the summary of the video?

  17. Patrick Höhe says:

    we are existentially separate but essentially associated. does he ask are we meeting because of that probably?

  18. Cicero Silva says:

    Krishnamurti is the best thinker! His Knowledge and teachings comes from a higher source. Love him so much!

  19. Tapas Roychoudhury says:

    One of the greatest sages of the modern spiritualism! !!

  20. mulhergato40 says:

    How could I spot fear without the memories of the past? I wouldn’t even know what fear is without my past experiences!

  21. Maya Krasikova says:

    We are living in diverse conditions, fear is natural because we have the capacity to think. Then some of us decide that fear stands in a way to achieve own potential and we start recognizing and healing to remove ourselves from own way.

  22. Nickey Jorgensen says:

    Thank you

  23. nitesh pant says:

    Wow !!!!!

  24. Christina Shahoyan says:

    incredible, omg)))

  25. Juan Robles says:

    To understand requires letting go of self will

  26. YourChemistryCoach-YCC says:

    I am watching this video to handle Deep Rooted unconscious emotion lets see how much helpful is this in 21 century

  27. Jump on Yaya says:

    I like how he gets little bit frustrated when people don't understand

  28. Fabiola Di Russo says:

    Thank you for your wisdom, clarity, simplicity, honesty. You were one unique , enlighted soul 🙏

  29. zenrr1 says:

    Damn I've listened to this a few times and it's confusing to me.

  30. A.S. Balasooriya says:

    Great sage after the Buddha!

  31. Atomic Muffin says:

    Turn fear into curoisity by forgetting the past and allowing new experiences.

  32. Yacov Mitchenko says:

    I'm not sure. When I say "I have been angry", have I necessarily divided myself from anger? Or has anger simply disappeared? Well, in a way, we're more than anger because awareness watches anger dissolve. Anger, like any sensation or feeling, disappears at some point. My capacity to inquire, to go into it, proves I cannot be simply anger. The question is: What exactly is watching it disappear?

  33. Yacov Mitchenko says:

    I may be wrong, but either I'm missing something Krishanmurti is pointing to or he's somewhat muddled. The observer is not only the observed because awareness watches the observed disappear (such as anger or any other sensation). Sensations disappear, as do thoughts. Unless he means: what I am is constantly coming and going, and awareness is not actually "me". It's true that there's no "me" one can point to, even though there's awareness. That sounds like a classic Buddhist teaching.

  34. Yacov Mitchenko says:

    It's true that pure awareness doesn't try to do anything. It has no intention of controlling, suppressing any kind of unpleasant emotion. Awareness simply is. Krishnamurti's point seems to be that the "controller" is part of the problem; it's just a reactive state, another link in the egoic chain. Yes, one can see that the "controller" or "suppressor" is just another guise of the "me".

  35. Yacov Mitchenko says:

    The answer is (and it's startlingly simple, so simple as to boggle the conditioned mind, which is accustomed to "doing"), the answer is: DO ABSOLUTELY NOTHING. BE NOTHING – psychologically. The end of conflict.

  36. deepbigeyes says:

    I can't help but see parallels with physical reality and quantum physics. It's all so fundamentally unintuitive what he says. Yet, it does have some validity in science, and for the practicing soul that is trying to train ones mind. To domesticate the wild animal that is the human psyche, it all rings very true. Try what he says, which echos the wisdom of so many of our spiritual sciences, and I think we will see, it leads to an objectivity that is empowering.

  37. deepbigeyes says:

    His one flaw is he becomes, at times, so frustrated in his delivery, and so projects he is condescending. This is not exemplary of a peaceful mind. But he would likely be the first to admit his frailties. He as he has said, is not your guru. So this reminds you that he is only a guide, a human one.

  38. deepbigeyes says:

    My one argument would be, fear does exist. And it's beneficial to human existence. It's how that fear is interpreted and controlled. How it is harnessed that is critical. Fear, evolutionary speaking is fundamental to our survival. It's when that pressure is not controlled and harnessed and understood, as he eloquently guides us, that it becomes useless and regressive.

  39. Hansel says:

    People can't realize the great wisdom behind of what he's saying…Time and thoughts are the root of fear

  40. Neha Choudhary says:

    Pure intelligence

  41. Derek Humfleet says:

    💚💨💚

  42. Sumit Mathur says:

    He talked about creating an image.. Living in fear is creating an image of self with fear and living with that image. Seeing the mirror of fear brings up the same image that is affected by it all the time. We're not afraid of fear itself, but of the image of it that mind has created.

  43. Friedrich. Nietzsche says:

    < ‘Three quarters of all evil in the world comes from fear’

  44. SUSHEEL KUMAR YADAV says:

    🤹🙏🙏🙏

  45. crazymansfan says:

    i'm afraid of death, but also curious of what happens after, oftenly think of suicide

  46. Seamus De buitleir says:

    A master in human behavior,thank you…..

  47. Nickey Jorgensen says:

    Thank you

  48. anilkumar V says:

    Golden words from Mr. J K, thanks for uploading.

  49. Melody Guzman says:

    Thank you 🙏❤️

  50. East Texas Suburban Homesteading says:

    the root of fear is satan

  51. Mana Litix says:

    Fear of not being understood which means fear of wasting energy on both sides of the interaction. Fear consumes energy. Lets keep fear as a friend. It will keep us alive but also lets observe it and try to let it go when it is not serving us. Intelligent fear management by means of observation/attention and letting go.

  52. Lee Wawson says:

    Awesome Awareness 🔆 Namaste

  53. Lee Wawson says:

    Awareness ⚡ without ⚡ Thought

  54. Sanjay M says:

    Any link to the following Saturday talk which he mentions would be appreciated, thanks

  55. Thirumal Kumar T V says:

    Thank u for sharing this extraordinary content

  56. Bandeep Singh says:

    Fear is a futuristic thought of an inexperienced situation which is believed to be harmful/defeating to physical and/or psychological being.

  57. Carpenter Family says:

    15:03 Time & thought is the root of fear.
    17:21 Don’t pursue an abstraction of this idea, instead know the truth of it.
    20:03 As the observer you are not it, in it. ( Fear, or any other emotion. )
    27:15 Conflict of Duality, can it end ?
    28:55 ‘Me-less observer’
    31:02 The knowledge is the past – causes a physiologic division in the present.
    32:30 Remembrance of fear does this too.
    35:28 Give total attention to fear ( looking at it ) – it is known now ( not remembered as past knowledge ) then fear of it is gone.

  58. Sandra Ekhoff says:

    krishnamurti's teachings are SO, SO Profund!! The world, schools and everysingle aspect of this world needs to understand this!! This is MEDICINE, MEDICINE for the MIND, SPIRIT or Consciousness!!! Thank you Universe for allowing me to continuing finding the TRUTH, finding YOU!!

  59. Authentic Self Guide says:

    Time and thought are the roots of fear.

  60. Mahavir Singh says:

    I understand it fully sir, what a man he was, he put all his energy to make us understand that just look at the things without holding on to your memory about the things. That wife example is just awesome. I look at my wife through my memories about her and the same is true in case of fear, anger, etc. Just look at your wife without any past memories of her.

  61. Jay Parmar says:

    A mind which is utterly free from phycological fear is an extraordinary mind.

  62. mohit says:

    😭😭 I am not able to understand what is he saying. Oh god give me ability to understand. Can someone translate it into Hind?

  63. Biswadip Bandyopadhyay says:

    It's always great to listen to him. So many ways he explained the same thing. I feel his frustration too, he wanted us to grasp the essence in a fraction of second. But very very few are blessed with that kind of sharp intellegence.

  64. Sunny S says:

    Just listen and know. This is true meditation to be just be. Jk is great living mystic. People are so asleep, he is trying to express that which can't be said, but only observed experiencing. Great sir i love you. Swapnil

  65. Yuji Tsukada says:

    the mind that has fear is a destructive, aggressive, neurotic mind, whereas a mind utterly free of fear is an extraordinary mind. ill remember this quote from him.

  66. kelly montes says:

    Yes, it is so clear. This examination of fear and the minds stance as using the past and acting as the observer was where I was stuck. Fear can only exist as thought and belief in those thoughts created my reality. Is the Saturday class that he refers to also available? Thank you so much.

  67. yshk viswanatham says:

    You feel like that I am not attract money you feel like that response to yourself ,allways not my work what you do it it is completely your response.

  68. hard core says:

    you must love him

  69. Nairolf says:

    Where is the video of the “Saturday” does this someone have?

  70. Omar Yarbrough says:

    bruce lee and jk saved my life. martial arts makes it easier to understand. just look at the beginning of ufc and now. you will be very hard pressed to see someone that’s purely from one style jump into the octagon today. “be like water” bruce lee. im no style therefore i am all styles.

  71. Ajit Sahoo says:

    Amazing video . Such clarity on thoughts . Mind fears everything . Mind's biggest fear is heart . It never allows heart to be the master . Even though heart is the original master . It's the same in our day to day life where the boss or senior won't allow juniors to surpass him even though he/she knows that someone else is more capable.

  72. G Sharma says:

    🙏🌹❤️❤️❤️❤️🌹🙏

  73. mikey deshore says:

    the key thing he says to observe then the 'me' the 'i' must not be there. what we take ourselves to be the 'i' the person is a psychological construct of time. this is the quintessential teaching of advita vedenta. that you are actually the awareness the pure conciousness in which this imagined 'i' appears. i have found this known as 'the self' through meditation. if you want to look into this look up sri ramanamaharishi and his i nstruction on 'who am i?' jk is good but he makes it too intellectual. only after awakening through meditation and instruction via gurus am i now able to understand his very words as truth. you cannot understand jk through the mind for what he points to is beyond the mind.

  74. Maria Makinen says:

    Cherish it.

  75. Godavego gogo says:

    the practical approach to ending fear is to know it in real time, which is your self afraid, psychological fears are the strongest discoveries while the physical fears may be the easiest way in to that picture window within the brain itself, not escaping, having contact with the array of feelings and its thoughts while discovering its methods, its joys and its madness's like observing Brazilian Quartz, with the joy of learning and the exhilaration of being enlivened by it all…
    One of K's best descriptions of the non-commercialized self-directed method that leaves the self no-more for a second or a day

  76. Godavego gogo says:

    once the brain sees itself producing psychological time just once it can never unsee the entire process of the production of fear…
    not as reoccurring memory… it is as thought the form of perception or intelligence has changed itself without much effort

  77. abhishek reddy says:

    I am unable to live during his speeches. I am very sad for this.

  78. charles says:

    If one has observed, this problem of fear has existed from time immemorial. Right? It has existed with man. And man has lived with it; both consciously or hidden deep down; its roots very, very deep. And either we have escaped from it through logic, through analysis, through any form of entertainment that helps us to avoid coming directly into contact with it, and holding it; or we have suppressed it. Right? We are doing this. Or we neglect it; we say, what, we have lived with fear for million years, say, what does it matter now? And one knows the consequences of fear. The physical shrinkage, a tendency to be hypocritical, resistance, an avoidance of the fact that one is really afraid.

    So if one really profoundly wants to be free from that reaction called fear, one has to go to the very root of it. There are biological fears: the body, the organism, which must protect itself; and the fear of disease, old age, death, and the fears of past memories. So fear is again a common ground upon which all human beings stand. So either we deal with it superficially or enquire into it very, very deeply.

    What is the root of fear? I know – one knows various forms of fear: death, old age, fear of tomorrow, fear of uncertainty, fear of insecurity, fear of not being loved or loved and not receiving that love, fear of loneliness; fear of loss, fear of not having anybody to depend on, and so on. There are various forms of fear; the fear of the dark, the fear of light. Do we deal with the outward forms of fear: That is, I am afraid of my wife, or I am afraid of a bully; a bully bullying all the time, you lie, you do all kinds of things; and there is the fear of that constant pressure of an aggressive, slightly demented person. So do we want to deal with fear superficially, which is intellectually, verbally, or do we want to go into it very, very, very deeply? Or, you go into it observing its very nature, structure, how it comes into being.

    When we want to deal with it deeply, go to the very root of it, what is the root of fear? Please, I am not telling you; the speaker is not pointing out; we are together investigating into a tremendous complicated problem, which has crippled humanity. And out of fear we have done all kinds of things; invented all the gods on earth. If there is absolutely no psychological fear, then you are beyond all gods. So what is basically the root of fear?

    Is it time and thought? Please, we are investigating, I am not telling you; I am questioning. Is it time, the future; or the past; and is it also thought, thinking about the future; thinking about the past; thinking what might happen, or what has happened. The future is time. The past is time. The past modifying itself in the present moves towards tomorrow, the future. The remembrance of an incident, which has caused fear, and the future of that incident awakening the new fear – you are following all this? Am I talking to myself, or we are meeting each other? So there is horizontal fear and vertical fear. Right?

    So I am – we are asking, is it time? The past, the present and the future. I am afraid – one is afraid of the present: the instability, the threat of war; the bomb that some country, another great tribal country, might put on this, and so on. So one is afraid of the past, the present, and the future. It is a movement. Right? This is not something that is static, it is a movement. And so a movement means time; from here to the village requires time to travel, to go to the village. From one point to another point means time. So we are asking if time is one of the factors of fear. Logically, it seems so; rationally, sanely. And is thought also the root of fear? I think tomorrow might bring me unemployment, I will be unemployed tomorrow. The thinking about it while I am employed, thinking about tomorrow is also the beginning of fear. Right, you are following? Thinking about the past, the incidents, the psychological accident which has brought about certain forms of fear; thinking about the past, thinking about the future, thinking about the actual moment of life in which there is such tremendous uncertainty, thought breeds fear. Right? You are following all this?

  79. caterina ayele says:

    Glad to have been able to carefully listen to this LESSON!

  80. Sesta Senta says:

    Mind blowing 🙌

  81. Neil Pollicino says:

    Where was Krishnamurti when I needed him…oh, of course “when the student is ready, the teacher will appear “
    DUH ‼️

  82. Tarot Inseeya says:

    true

  83. Hillsdale says:

    Is he in a forest or on a stage? Hahah.. A true master. Thank you for your insights Sir

  84. Matt Davis says:

    A living breathing walking Buddha, that's what that man is… At least when he was alive that is

  85. Jirasuta Sakulkittithumrong says:

    Time and thought are the roots of fear. Change the wiring in our brains by having presence.

    The speaker tried very hard to explain it to us but it is a very difficult subject.

  86. Paul G. says:

    No thought, no problem. No thought no fear. Be here now, in thoughtless awareness………..where is the fear.

  87. John Terry says:

    So many youtubers pretending to understand this and be cured.

  88. Sandesh Khadka says:

    o for gods sake

  89. de'jhara mckinney says:

    had to write down excerpts of his speech which spoke out to me and I have to sit on them. think about it. had to constantly rewind and pause and then right at the end, it was like glue. everything pieced together.

  90. alyssa culpepper says:

    Fear is the absence of love

  91. retipser j says:

    I wasn't not even born when he was giving speeches, but now I miss him a lot

  92. Tina Andresen says:

    Thank you so much for sharing these insights here. Peace and love to all beings of this Universe. 🙏❤️🕊

  93. Authentic Self Guide says:

    Time and thought are the roots of fear.

  94. Red Leaf says:

    If all belongs & comes from Source, it must serve a purpose.

  95. TheKevoyo says:

    Emotion is natural.

  96. Ram Sunder says:

    The real one for modern era in his yellow robe under bow tree.

  97. Nazım Erkaya says:

    He is talking about a very subtle paradox: fear is only experienced because of a conflict between the observer (me) and the observed (time and thought). This differentiation between "me" and "fear" is the very root cause of fear per se. So, he proposes, in order to free yourself from experiencing fear, transform the moment of fear by "becoming" your fear; that is by removing time and thought, that is the past/the observer/the "I" from the equation. This is what he means by "paying close attention to fear, for then fear is not". When you are truly (concentrated) in the present moment, you are experiencing the present like a new-born baby, like a toddler in a horror movie, just smiling at the monster because it has no previous registration of such a thing as a monster to be afraid of, thus you remove the past (experience/recording of a reaction as fear), that is time&thought and with them the conflict between "I" and "fear", from the equation. Paradoxically, this concentration distracts you and by doing so, frees you from fear. So, only when you confront(?) fear in the present moment, without fighting it, can you remove the Conflict which created fear in the first place.

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